culture

An impression of the stageplay: the Baker’s Wife (using major tenets from Aristotle’s “Poetics”)

I  had not previously been to a theatre to view a play before this evening. I was not excited about the prospect of a two hour long musical. Admittedly though, after the first ten minutes of the production I was hooked. I rather enjoyed the characters and their roles within the story. I think this play should receive more than the cultist following that it has.  My favorite character was the town’s unscrupulous mayor, the Marquis.  I had an easy enough time following the storyline and the characters progression. I was keen on the techniques we had read about and seen on television in our chapter on the Greek tragedies/comedies and how the methods closely related to the story.  

Alhough I am not entirely sure that this story is a direct reflection of the classical definition of the word Tragedy it does loosely follow some of the same principles: The main character and protagonist Aimable Castagnet is a character that doesn’t get presented with any negative connotation. He is a commendable man whom leads a virtuous life as a simple baker. He deeply loves a woman that is much younger than him and does his best to supply every moment of her day with his love for her.

            The Hamartia of his character is that because he is so nice he may seem boorish and naïve to both the townspeople and his young bride. He is politely mocked by the townspeople about their age difference and eventually through his bread making wisdom the antihero (Dominique) enters the stage by way of the Marquis. He is the polar opposite of the main character and sets his sights on the baker’s young wife.  This ultimately leads to his downfall which is the part when Dominique who was secretly courting his wife both leave in the night and Aimable inadvertently burns his shop.

            This represents the Cathartic change Aimable undergoes as he is struck down from his own existence and falls into despair. He does not work or maintain his proper social etiquette by drinking heavily and losing his bearing with the town. But this is also where the story does not follow the tragic definition any longer. In this story the townspeople whom had taken great issues with one another were faced with the responsibility to put their prejudices aside and aid their baker in winning back his wife.  In the end all was resolved and everyone was happy.

For more information you can consult this link ( http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Baker’s_Wife ) to read the synopsis and a general overview of this stageplay/musical.

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Death

      That infamous moment when the music stops, the scrambling, clawing, kicking and screaming begin. This chaos is in sharp contrast to the preceding time that was spent making the necessary preparations to ensure that survival; alliances were struck to overcome stronger opponents, friendships made, plotting, planning and even scheming were all employed at some point. But in the end there are only a limited number of chairs which are cruelly disproportionate to the many who would lay claim to them. And only in that moment does Death reveal itself as an elemental player in this woeful game that has been with you throughout the whole time you were playing. We then realize that there will be no more days left to waste without even a thought of tomorrow. To not say the words we wished to say to someone because we simply cannot find the right time for them to be spoken. Or to make the preparations that are needed to ensure the ease of those left behind. Death is the moment when everything ceases. It is a natural response that does not favor any one person or time over another.  Death will lay its claim to us all at some point, some before their perceived time and others too late to be offered any justice.

A personal comparison/contrast essay of the main character in Tom Whitecloud’s Iconic reading: Blue Winds Dancing

“What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us.” This statement is an iconic quote made by the American poet and essayist Ralph Waldo Emerson. People often look different, talk different and have different viewpoints but almost always have the same end result in mind. Both Tom Whitecloud’s character in the story “Blue Winds Dancing” and I have many differences in almost every conceivable area of measure. We are not the same race, age, or possess the same beliefs or values. It would be easy to draw the conclusion that we are the proverbial “apples and oranges”. But it is only upon closer inspection that there are such striking similarities between the two us that they seem almost nearly identical.

            The Author’s character in his story ventures away from the reservation from which he was raised and attends a college far from his home. He is not learning the history and philosophies of his ancestry but the supplant information to override those truths with Eurocentric ideals. This setting has a unique effect on him because the teachings he learns there directly contradict and seemingly belittle the traditions of his people. The protagonist comes to a conclusion that he does not fully relate to his fellow tribesman or the white students. And from this point the character makes a choice to abandon one of these ideals in favor of fully embracing the other so he leaves school and finds his way back to his reservation to be with his family.

            Similarly, I have also made choices that have led me far away from my home. I have adopted a whole other cultural mindset in addition to the one I was raised with. I accomplished this means by enlisting into the United States Marine Corps immediately after graduating from high school. This decision had greatly affected my life but did not improve it in the way in which I thought it would. I, like the protagonist,  found myself balancing two lifestyles that were not intermixable and causing growing communication problems between my personal relationships as well as my job. I elected to only focus on the choice that had more impact in my life and concluded my service to the Marines after two enlistments.

            In contrast to how the actual mechanics of each tale unravel, the end result is quite polarizing. Whitecloud’s character in the end of his story concluded that he wanted to be free and live as his people did without the added adoption of the white American culture. He returned home and was accepted back as a member of his tribal unit once again. He realized that his familial bond was too great and needed to be more prevalent in his life whereas I have not espoused the same fervor for being close to my family. Upon leaving the Marines I did not return to where my family lives but settled down farther away to establish my own identity and endeavor to make my own way. This is an interesting answer to how people approach evolving their ancestry in modern times.

            There are many interesting and varied people in the world who have so many different and unique cultural processes. A person can easily forget that the choices we all make as humans nearly always reflect the same sentiment towards some basic values that are inherent to us all: family, love, duty, responsibility are just a few. This knowledge leaves us all with the thought that maybe for all of our striking differences we are more alike than we realize…

In the courtyard of the Masjid-I Jami: a study in beauty and precision

   Mosques are a sacred pillar in Islamic life and are living centers for civic and religious ceremony. They serve as schools for children and adults alike; they also host community, social and political functions. They can be thought of as a place of worship, wisdom, and fellowship. The Masjid-I Jami or congregation mosque in Isfahan Iran is one such mosque worthy of note. It was created in the 10th century and has steadily evolved from its start to fit and suit the needs of its population. This is not to say that the work completed on this edifice has merely been structural. There have been many great additions to the visual appeal of the mosque during its time to further deify and celebrate Allah and his role in the Muslim way of life. This mosque is a visual celebration of Islamic culture and this author will attempt to define some key areas that make this important fixture a work of living art.  

Seljuk brickwork patterns on the Masjid-i Jami in Isfahan, Iran. Photo courtesy of http://www.islamicity.org

 

  The FORM of the example is expansive. This mosque is a largely executed attempt to accommodate the male population of its community. It is a simple building which is then elaborately decorated by its caretakers or expanded to fulfill the needs of the community. The LINES are straight and precise for the general framework of the building. They are perpendicular and parallel in such deliberate quantities that a feeling of structure, safety, and ultimately righteousness can be found in its visage. This strict and functional canvas of structure compliments the COMPOSITION that the artisans have created in the way they have used a multitude of muslim muqarnas (a type of stacked niche) set along great vaulted arches. These features have within them even more niches that all of which tell a story or relay a quoted scripture from the Qur’an.  

Facade covered with Kufic inscriptions and intricate tilework. Photo by Sojta Serjber, panoramio

 

  On this particular “canvas”, the MATERIALS and TECHNIQUE used to decorate and define this mosque are simply staggering. The façade is completed in a cobalt blue mosaic background with high levels of detail executed in contrast to the base color. There are borders of the mosaic tile around the arches and niches that serve to define the structure as well as design “themes” that differ based on where they are located (i.e. flat walls have a “basic” carryover design which then changes when the pattern reaches a minaret or dome, it then becomes more geometric in its appearance). The amount of visual data presented is truly overwhelming to the human eye. The painstaking amount of tedium that was needed to set these individually carved and cut pieces of tile and then place them in such a precise order so that they could resemble a required shape or even the Kufic Language is a masterstroke to the artists that created this monument.  

   The use of COLOR choice on this work is both striking and befitting of its purpose. The locale around this building (geographically speaking) is muted and generally restricted to earth tones. In defiance, this building stands in high relief to its environment being mainly composed of a deep blue mosaic covering. The Contrast in colors is a beacon to all who are within sight of it and serves as a constant reminder to its faithful following.  

   The area this community place occupies for its intended purpose is forever changing throughout its lifespan. The entire structure is devoted to ease the fundamentals of its religion and to allow for all way of procession to occur within it. Theses borders can then be expanded according to the needs of its following. This is an example of how SPACE was used when conceiving this artwork.  

  This has been a small summary of the basic components needed to objectively rate an artwork for what it and what it was meant to be. My rantings on this lovely mosque are by no means the only interpretations that can be concluded and are far from the results that an in-depth and scholarly study of the structure would derive. This writing was presented from a more generalist and amateur enthusiasts viewpoint.