thoughts

Death

      That infamous moment when the music stops, the scrambling, clawing, kicking and screaming begin. This chaos is in sharp contrast to the preceding time that was spent making the necessary preparations to ensure that survival; alliances were struck to overcome stronger opponents, friendships made, plotting, planning and even scheming were all employed at some point. But in the end there are only a limited number of chairs which are cruelly disproportionate to the many who would lay claim to them. And only in that moment does Death reveal itself as an elemental player in this woeful game that has been with you throughout the whole time you were playing. We then realize that there will be no more days left to waste without even a thought of tomorrow. To not say the words we wished to say to someone because we simply cannot find the right time for them to be spoken. Or to make the preparations that are needed to ensure the ease of those left behind. Death is the moment when everything ceases. It is a natural response that does not favor any one person or time over another.  Death will lay its claim to us all at some point, some before their perceived time and others too late to be offered any justice.

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A study of the speaker in Sir Walter Raleigh’s “The Nymph’s Reply to the Shepherd”

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Nymph’s_Reply_to_the_Shepherd

 DISCLAIMER!!!!!!!!!!    [ Make sure you guys read this first (unless you already know it :)]

This is an essay that dwells on a work by Sir Walter Raleigh. I found myself entranced by this selection’s eloquence and delicate beauty of form and structure. Below is my take on the point of view the poem is built around and hopefully demystifies any cryptic verbal passages therein.

The “speaker” in Raleigh’s poem is a nymph that is having a conversation with a shepherd about the state of the world as it is. This is a very interesting poem for me because it has so many implied meanings about the way the world has shirked its youthful innocence and become a little too hardened for the tastes of the nymph. It is my belief the nymph portrays; fancy, love, romance, playfulness and fantasy. These are all the common thoughts that lift us all out of the mire that can be our physical reality. I believe Raleigh is using this language to connote a longing for the world to be very much the poetic and emotional environment that exists only in the minds of writers, children, and lovers. This beautiful poem is brought to life with the use of many metaphorical implications that convey the authors meaning in a muted and understated way.

               The nymph articulates to the shepherd within the first stanza that the world is no longer young nor its inhabitants truthful. She goes on to mandate that if these obstacles could be overcome then she may be inclined to love the world and the shepherd again.  These statements speak to the way of the natural world we live as humans. Notions of these delicate tenets are not the practiced law of the land and we as shepherds have done much deceit to propagate our own existence at the cost of paradise on earth.

               Following the lead stanza the poem develops further on the idea of the comparison of nature and its seasons with the knowledge that everything will die or at its very least fade. In such lines as “Time drives the flock s from field to fold, when rivers rage and rocks grow cold” there is a melancholy sense that an era is passing and will be marked by a future that is uncertain in terms of its predecessor.

               The third stanza is speaking about a relationship and how it withers in the winter’s onset. It draws contrast from the waning of the fields by also explaining the symptoms of spring and its refreshing and renewal factor in life. This alludes me to believe the stanza speaks about the possibility of the fear of losing an older love to a new fresher more youthful lover.

               “Thy gowns, thy shoes, thy bed of roses, thy cap, thy kirtle and thy posies / Soon break soon wither, soon forgotten – in folly ripe, in season rotten” This is especially powerful verse in the prose. Here the descriptors are not metaphorical or implied but plainly stated and relatable to everyday life. In this stanza the feelings of the nymph are concrete and final. She knows that all the earthly items of love and womanhood are doomed to be loved less over time. She is saying that the way in which the shepherd acts now is not an honest reflection on the way he will act in future days and this is merely an act of lust not love.

               In the second to last stanza there are some comparisons made that relate nature’s beauty to a thing of ornate jewelry that is customarily given to ones lover and is symbolic of their commitment. The nymph is saying that these things cannot dissuade her to fall in love merely in and of themselves.

               During the last stanza the nymph mandates what would need to be done for her to love the shepherd. She wants everlasting youth, undying love and the bliss of wonderment for eternity. These commitments speak for the underlying thoughts in every lover when they want to be sure that their mate is feeling the same way as they do. This is the common link in all relationships at one point or another. I think that both parties know the answer to their problems at this point. It seems folly to believe these things can come true in any other realm than ideal.

               In this poem are many contemporary and basically human references that imply to our fondness of natural beauty and the change of the seasons and how it correlates with our lives. To me this poem can be construed in any number of ways, but considering that my reading is the closest to the author’s actual intent then I believe the poem is about earth and humanity. I think Raleigh is writing about the loss of innocence and the ideas of whimsy and love that go missing throughout the routine of our lives. I believe he wants to encourage the reader to embrace the simple beauty of life and make a marriage to the idea that we all need to be grounded and realize there are many beautiful things in our surroundings and make every opportunity to appreciate these less logical and inspiring moments. This is an almost tragic poem and maybe intentionally requires one to act in defiance of the terms it defines in its structure. I greatly enjoyed this reading and found it to be one of my more favorite selections.

Has the dream been realized?: a reflection on the civil rights movement in the clime of the Jena 6 and the election of our 44th president.

   

Dr. Martin Luther King in Washington D.C.

 

 On August 28, 1963 beneath a sweltering Washington D.C. sun resumed a journey for redemption that had begun nearly four hundred years earlier across the mighty Atlantic Ocean. As a people who, stripped of their pride and dignity were utilized as an expendable resource in a foreign land to carry out the tasks that seemed to be beneath the doing of white hands. These “tasks” that those slaves were burdened where the toils of enduring harshness that have built the very bedrock of our land. And from that land over three hundred thousand men and women of all colors and religious denominations have congregated at our nation’s capitol to embody a growing outrage that was not being given proper remedy.  Those that gathered where; of assorted and varying race, unified with one another, and peaceful but thunderously demanding that an end be brought to the injustices that had been delivered to them through the cold motions of indolence and dispassionate action from their government.  Here in front of the Lincoln Memorial, Dr. Martin Luther King would have seen the masses that collectively gathered and displayed no sense of individuality or apparent distinction from one person to the next. Here, all is how he must have envisioned in his dream. And from this place of turbulence and roiling unrest articulated and with all the soothing nature his clerical background could muster he imparted an ever hopeful plea into what was to become a lighthouse beacon shining through the darkest of nights. A plea that Illuminated even the most bewildered and lost souls to usher in a new chapter of peace and brotherhood for every person who would call themselves American.  

            Although, in light of the many advances and tolerances we now enjoy in today’s society there is a small, creeping notion to uphold the walls of indifference that were built up so long ago. Though the fires of racial injustice have been all but extinguished, beneath those very ashes smolder the embers of dissension and mistrust.  We  are now faced with not reigning in the fiery content of a person’s speech or ending the malicious content of their actions, but to try to open the most important of all conduits; our minds. We have now in recent times seen such blaring examples of the old world that still fester within the very halls of justice.  Actions that sharply contrast our popular ideal of what equality and progress have come to mean. Travesties such as the “Jena 6” in which there is an obvious bias in how ” law” is metered  out to even our own children.  And unbelievably, no clear resolution was made to correct these missteps until the verge of a civil thunderstorm was brought to bear on the small town of Jena. This abhorrence of  justice was a flashpoint to causing  old familiar labels to be made again and giving those who had not yet been burned by hatred a chance to stir those ashes and unearth that underlying intolerance renewed.  

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               And still, after almost forty six years, those prophetic words of peace and harmony that Dr. King spoke to us  have struggled at times but certainly have endured. We are no longer a country  openly divided which can sanction arbitrary laws that limit the expansion of a person’s intellect or bar an individual  from using the common facilities that are public and located at reasonable distances or means. We have learned to co-exist and become the richer for it. The examples of our cultures merging is apparent and all around. From seeing couples of mixed racial background freely enjoying each other’s company to school children sharing their lunches at recess. The time for wholesale bigotry has been brought to a much needed and abrupt end.  We have, in less than fifty years, done much to level the partitions that stand between unity and the union of improving our lives together. We are making strides to uplift the status of the most exalted of all religious teachings, fellowship. We have proudly claimed a victory to that end with the overwhelming election of our forty-fourth president. These are extraordinary times that would surely have made Dr. Martin Luther King very deeply satisfied with the evolution of his aspirations. Time is the healer of all wounds but the ointment which promotes a strong and healthy recovery is the faith of the people who carry their vision high and share it for all to see.  

            But still in this pursuit of companionship there have also been many casualties along the way. Good men and women who have at their end compiled a portfolio of understanding and compassion for even the ones who have dealt them their final blow. We have lost irreplaceable minds in senseless acts. These losses have incited everyone at one time or another to question whether or not the cause is lost. We are reminded of the sting that accompanies the departing of heroic icons that brave the unrelenting odds and the void in which they leave in their wake. To have shone so brightly and burned out so young is a painful transition for all to comprehend. But within that grief there lays a strong testament to the validity and urgency of the ever widening chasm they had given their lives to span. For across that great divide lies the sweet tranquility of the Promised Land. And in that sense their struggle seems duly justified.